Dennis Herrick's blog

  

Film or TV series about Esteban — could it be possible?

Tue, 04/14/2020 - 11:25
Dennis Herrick

A prestigious Santa Fe film rights company contacted the author of Esteban: The African Slave Who Explored America and is seeking a company that would produce a movie or TV series about Esteban's incredible story told in the book.
     It's possible (likely?) that nothing will come of the effort, but it still is a reaffirmation that Esteban's adventures are so dramatic that a national company feels the Esteban story should be reach a film audience.

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Who was that Indian girl's daddy?

Thu, 03/19/2020 - 17:35
Dennis Herrick

There is a curious omission of sex by the entire Cabeza de Vaca group over the eight years of their travel across the continent. While enslaved, that's understandable, but in the last year and a half while they were on friendly terms with Indian women often naked or nearly naked, it seems less credible.
     This is mentioned because writers have made major and escalating accusations against Esteban about having sexual liaisons with native women, stating their opinions as fact despite no evidence.

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Discussion guide for book clubs

Fri, 10/04/2019 - 14:59
Dennis Herrick

A discussion guide is available for book clubs (or individuals) that read Esteban: The African Slave Who Explored America.
     Because the book's events take place in the sixteenth century, which is a period unfamiliar to many readers, the discussion guide explains concepts that might seem strange to the modern reader.
     The discussion guide can be downloaded at http://dennisherrick.com/downloads/Esteban%20Discussion%20Guide.pdf

 

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Enslaved Africans taken to Virginia in 1619

Fri, 08/23/2019 - 13:10
Dennis Herrick

Traditionalist histories claim that slavery started in what is now the United States on or about August 20, 1619, when a British ship appeared in Chesapeake Bay and traded for food "20 and odd" Africans seized from a Portuguese slave ship.
      The White Lion, a British-owned privateer operating under a Dutch flag, "sold" the Angolans to planters of Viriginia's earliest tobacco fields at what is now Hampton, Virginia, less than forty miles from the Jamestown settllement.

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Did "political correctness" relegate Esteban to a background role in Cabeza de Vaca's account?

Sat, 06/01/2019 - 19:08
Dennis Herrick

A friend proposed that Cabeza de Vaca deliberately kept Esteban in the background in his 1542 book, possibly even with Esteban's knowledge.
      Cabeza de Vaca never mentioned Esteban in the first half of his account about the Narváez expedition to Florida.  During their cross-continent trek, Cabeza de Vaca referred to the African slave sporadically by name but usually by simply labeling Esteban as El Negro. He  even credited some of Esteban's achievements to others.

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